Shredder Information

Shredder Longevity

Historically, the longevity of shredders is directly dependent on the severity of operating conditions due to a facility’s ability to segregate non-shreddables from the waste stream. Under optimum conditions and good segregation practices, a two-stage shredder’s cutting teeth may last as long as two years. Because San-I-Pak shredders are low speed (less than 10 RPM) and high torque, they do not self-destruct like high speed (greater than 40 RPM) particilizers and grinders.

The advent of our advanced electronic sensing system has extended the life of the cutter teeth by stopping the rotation of the blades before they break. Cutter teeth used under conventional sensing technology rarely last longer than 6 months. In order to minimize the possibility of damage to the shredder system from unshreddable material San-I-Pak has designed its systems to allow the operator to view the waste before it is introduced into the shredding system, and removes any material that will cause damage. San-I-Pak shredding system are low speed, high torque systems with electronic monitoring which will remove power to the cutter teeth in less than eight one hundredths of a second. This significantly reduces the likelihood of cutter teeth being broken by an unshreddable object.

The thicker the cutter blades of a shredding system, the shorter the processing time and the greater the volume processed per hour. Also, thicker shredder blades will reduce maintenance and decrease damage caused by the inclusion of non-shreddables into the waste stream. However, the particle size of the final product increases in size with direct correlation to the thickness of the blades. Because thicker blades are more durable, maximizing the size of the cutter blades is always a goal. In order to meet the desired particle size required by your facility, our engineers will assist you in blade selection.

To Shred or Not to Shred?

In recognition that most healthcare facilities search for the most reliable and economical means of disposing of medical waste, San-I-Pak has invested over two decades researching the best shredder technology to apply to materials that comprise of medial waste. In addition to the quality of the shredders, it was very important to design a system, which does not obligate the entire system to shredding. In other words, we have seen several occasions where facilities, which have a treatment/shredding system, have decided to discontinue the practice of shredding. Reasons range from:

  • Significant maintenance
  • Landfill’s desire for recognizable waste, visual proof of sterilization
  • Odor from shredding the hot treated material
  • Shredded dabre which is easily carried by any wind or draft

Because any one of these issues may arise after operation has commenced, the San-I-Pak design allows any facility the flexibility to either shred or bypass the shredder. Since the treated material is encapsulated in a polypropylene liner, the shrunken waste can easily be identified as treated.

Non-Shreddables Protections and Removal:

In order to minimize the possibility of damage to the shredder system from unshreddable material San-I-Pak has designed its systems to allow the operator to view the waste before it is introduced into the shredding system, and removes any material that will cause damage. Since San-I-Pak designs and manufactures the electronics for shredding systems, it is important to note how quickly the systems are able to respond to non-shreddable objects, seven milliseconds, to reverse the shredder when such material enters the system. Other systems average a forty-seven-millisecond response time. This can easily equate to significant damage and stress put on the teeth, motor, and shredder casing at 1740 drive motor speed.

Since the shredder will be a vital part of the system, we have engineered, not only for electronic response, but also our patented hopper access door design. Unlike other shredders on the market, when a non-shreddable object enters the shredder, there is an internal mechanism, which hydraulically moves the waste out of the way and allows for easy access through a door on the side. We have eliminated the need for the engineer to climb up into the hopper and move the waste out of the way to access the non-shreddable item. In turn, we have minimized the potential risk of a “stick” injury while servicing the shredders. This procedure is required for all other shredding systems.